lishu

lìshū 隷書 also known as official or scribal script, is the clerical script used in Chinese calligraphy.


xíngshū 行书 is a semi-cursive script or running script used in Chinese calligraphy. Compared to kǎishū, the brush leaves the paper less often.

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kaishu

Cǎoshū 草书is a cursive script (also known liter. as grass script) used in Chinese calligraphy. It is said that it was highly appreciated in Emperor Wu of Han reign (140–187 AD).


kǎishū 楷書 is the regular script often called standard script, emerging between the Chinese Han dynasty and Three Kingdoms period.

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Chinese calligraphy – The supreme visual art form

“In China, from a very early period, calligraphy was considered not just a form of decorative art; rather, it was viewed as the supreme visual art form, was more valued than painting and sculpture, and ranked alongside poetry as a means of self-expression and cultivation. How one wrote, in fact, was as important as what one wrote. To understand how calligraphy came to occupy such a prominent position, it is necessary to consider a variety of factors, such as the materials used in calligraphy and the nature of the Chinese written script as well as the esteem in which writing and literacy are held in traditional China.”

caoshu

Cǎoshū 草书is a cursive script (also known liter. as grass script) used in Chinese calligraphy. It is said that it was highly appreciated in Emperor Wu of Han reign (140–187 AD).


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