Kanji: 穫. Radical: 禾. Number of strokes: 18. Meaning: “ harvest”. Pronunciation: カクkaku.

Nan Pa’ch

Nan Pa’ch

Nan Pa'ch ceremony (or Paach ceremony) – A corn-veneration ritual giving thanks for good harvests celebrated in San Pedro Sacatepéquez, San Marcos in Guatemala. The ritual features prayers in the Mam language. Intangible Cultural Heritage of UNESCO in Need of Urgent Safeguarding 2013 “…The participants are mostly older farmers, both men and women, with extensive ties to the community and who are recognized as its leaders. Four prayer sayers, or parlamenteros, offer prayers during the ceremony, supported by four auxiliary parlamenteros; meanwhile four godmothers dress ceremonial corncobs and coordinate the preparation and serving of food.”


Cérémonie Nan Pa'ch (ou cérémonie Paach) - Un rituel de vénération du maïs pour remercier les bonnes récoltes célébrées à San Pedro Sacatepéquez, San Marcos au Guatemala. Le rituel comprend des prières en langue mam. Patrimoine culturel immatériel de l'UNESCO nécessitant une sauvegarde urgente 2013. « ...Les participants sont pour la plupart d’anciens fermiers, hommes et femmes, fortement liés à la communauté et qui sont reconnus comme meneurs par celle-ci. Quatre diseurs de prières parlamenteros offrent des prières au cours de la cérémonie, bénéficiant du soutien de quatre parlamenteros auxiliaires. Quatre marraines décorent les épis de maïs de façon cérémonielle et coordonnent la préparation et le service de la nourriture. »

Dia de Muertos – Facilitating the return of the souls…

"... Families facilitate the return of the souls to Earth by laying flower petals, candles and offerings along the path leading from the cemetery to their homes. The deceased’s favourite dishes are prepared and placed around the home shrine and the tomb alongside flowers and typical handicrafts, such as paper cut-outs. Great care is taken with all aspects of the preparations, for it is believed that the dead are capable of bringing prosperity (e.g. an abundant maize harvest) or misfortune (e.g. illness, accidents, financial difficulties) upon their families depending on how satisfactorily the rituals are executed. The dead are divided into several categories according to cause of death, age, sex and, in some cases, profession. A specific day of worship, determined by these categories, is designated for each deceased person. This encounter between the living and the dead affirms the role of the individual within society and contributes to reinforcing the political and social status of Mexico’s indigenous communities.

The Day of the Dead celebration holds great significance in the life of Mexico’s indigenous communities. The fusion of pre-Hispanic religious rites and Catholic feasts brings together two universes, one marked by indigenous belief systems, the other by worldviews introduced by the Europeans in the sixteenth century." (source: ich.unesco.org)

Yotaka festival

Yotaka festival

Tonami Yotaka Matsuri 砺波夜高祭り or Yotaka festival – An event held in June in Toyama Prefecture, Japan - Said to have started in the Taisho Period, asking for a bountiful harvest - At night, lamps using paper shades are lit.


Tonami Yotaka Matsuri 砺波夜高祭り ou festival Yotaka - Un événement organisé en juin dans la préfecture de Toyama au Japon - Il aurait commencé à l'époque de Taisho, en demande d’une abondante récolte - La nuit, des lampes en papier sont allumées.

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