lishu

lìshū 隷書 also known as official or scribal script, is the clerical script used in Chinese calligraphy.


xíngshū 行书 is a semi-cursive script or running script used in Chinese calligraphy. Compared to kǎishū, the brush leaves the paper less often.

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kaishu

Cǎoshū 草书is a cursive script (also known liter. as grass script) used in Chinese calligraphy. It is said that it was highly appreciated in Emperor Wu of Han reign (140–187 AD).


kǎishū 楷書 is the regular script often called standard script, emerging between the Chinese Han dynasty and Three Kingdoms period.

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caoshu

Cǎoshū 草书is a cursive script (also known liter. as grass script) used in Chinese calligraphy. It is said that it was highly appreciated in Emperor Wu of Han reign (140–187 AD).


Cǎoshū 草书is a cursive script (also known liter. as grass script) used in Chinese calligraphy. It is said that it was highly appreciated in Emperor Wu of Han reign (140–187 AD).

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Mongolian calligraphy

"Mongolian calligraphy is the technique of handwriting in the Classical Mongolian script, which comprises ninety letters connected vertically by continuous strokes to create words. After decades of suppression, Mongolian calligraphy has experienced a rebirth since the country's democratization in the 1990s. Traditionally, mentors select the best students and train them to be calligraphers over a period of five to eight years. At present, only three middle-aged scholars voluntarily train the small community of just over twenty young calligraphers." ich.unesco.org


"La calligraphie mongole est une technique d'écriture mongole classique qui repose sur quatre-vingt-dix lettres reliant verticalement des traits continus pour former des mots. La calligraphie mongole a connu une renaissance depuis la démocratisation de la Mongolie dans les années 1990, après des décennies de répression. Les mentors sélectionnent traditionnellement les meilleurs élèves et les forment pendant cinq à huit ans pour en faire des calligraphes. Actuellement, seuls trois universitaires d'âge mûr initient de manière bénévole une petite communauté d'une vingtaine de jeunes calligraphes à cet art." ich.unesco.org

Japanese calligraphy and mushin

“Calligraphy is commonly practiced by Zen buddhist monks. The Japanese philosopher Nishida Kitaro pointed out that the Zen calligraphy is not mastered by constant practice. To write Zen calligraphy the mind must be clear, and the characters flow out effortlessly. This state of mind is called mushin (無心), and means “consciousness without consciousness”. When practicing Japanese calligraphy, you should clear your mind and focus only on the meaning of the words you write.”

- gogonihon.com

Chinese calligraphy – The supreme visual art form

“In China, from a very early period, calligraphy was considered not just a form of decorative art; rather, it was viewed as the supreme visual art form, was more valued than painting and sculpture, and ranked alongside poetry as a means of self-expression and cultivation. How one wrote, in fact, was as important as what one wrote. To understand how calligraphy came to occupy such a prominent position, it is necessary to consider a variety of factors, such as the materials used in calligraphy and the nature of the Chinese written script as well as the esteem in which writing and literacy are held in traditional China.”

- asiasociety.org
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