Hebrew calendar

Hebrew or Jewish calendar (הַלּוּחַ הָעִבְרִי, Ha-Luah ha-Ivri) - Luni-solar calendar composed of solar years, lunar months, and seven-day weeks beginning on Sunday and ending on Saturday, Shabbat day. It begins with Genesis (Bereshit), said to correspond to the year 3761BCE in the Gregorian calendar. The years comprise twelve or thirteen lunar months, according to a so-called metonic cycle.


Calendrier hébreu

calendrier hébraïque (הַלּוּחַ הָעִבְרִי, Ha-Luah ha-Ivri) - Calendrier luni-solaire composé d’années solaires, de mois lunaires, et de semaines de sept jours commençant le dimanche et se terminant le samedi, jour du chabbat. Il commence avec la Genèse (Beréshit), correspondant à l’an 3761 avant l’ère chrétienne du calendrier grégorien. Les années comportent douze ou treize mois lunaires, selon un cycle dit métonique.

Genesis 1

Genesis 1
1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
2 Now the earth was [1] formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.
3 And God said, "Let there be light," and there was light.


Genèse 1
1.1 Au commencement, Dieu créa les cieux et la terre.
1.2 La terre était informe et vide: il y avait des ténèbres à la surface de l'abîme, et l'esprit de Dieu se mouvait au-dessus des eaux.
1.3 Dieu dit: Que la lumière soit! Et la lumière fut.

God created the heavens and the earth

[1:1] In the beginning when God created the heavens and the earth,
[1:2] the earth was a formless void and darkness covered the face of the deep, while a wind from God swept over the face of the waters.
[1:3] Then God said, "Let there be light"; and there was light.
[1:4] And God saw that the light was good; and God separated the light from the darkness.
[1:5] God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.


[1] Au commencement, Dieu créa les cieux et la terre. [2] La terre était informe et vide: il y avait des ténèbres à la surface de l'abîme, et l'esprit de Dieu se mouvait au-dessus des eaux. [3] Dieu dit: Que la lumière soit! Et la lumière fut. [4] Dieu vit que la lumière était bonne; et Dieu sépara la lumière d'avec les ténèbres. [5] Dieu appela la lumière jour, et il appela les ténèbres nuit. Ainsi, il y eut un soir, et il y eut un matin : ce fut le premier jour.

The name “Ararat” in the Bible

“The name “Ararat” is mentioned four times in the Bible’s original manuscripts (Genesis 8:4; 2 Kings 19:37; Isaiah 37:38; Jeremiah 51:27). This was the name of a country. On one of its mountains Noah’s ark rested after the Flood subsided (Genesis 8:4). Most researchers believe that the “mountains” mentioned were probably the Kurdish range of South Armenia in Turkey. In the King James Bible, 2 Kings 19:37 and Isaiah 37:38 translate the word “Ararat” as “Armenia.” However, other versions, including the New King James Version, simply say “land of Ararat.” […] In this area of modern Turkey, near the Russian and Iranian borders, there is a large mountain named Mount Ararat. It is made entirely of volcanic rock and is an extinct volcano that rose during Noah’s flood. The highest point is almost 17,000 feet above sea level, and the mountain consists of two peaks, Great Ararat and Little Ararat. It rises a majestic 14,000 feet from the plain of Aras (Araxes). The higher peak is perpetually covered in snow. […] It is believed that the land of “Ararat” is the Hebrew equivalent of Urardhu, or Urartu, which was the Assyrian-Babylonian name of the Vannic or Chaldean kingdom (between the Aras River and the Tigris River).” (christiananswers.net)

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